I Blame Roger!

And you should, too. Monster Month is now officially called Monster May(hem). BECAUSE OF HIM.

Moving on, this month’s challenge is shaping up quite well, with lots of submissions and more to come! I couldn’t be happier! Maybe I’ll turn this into an annual challenge, like Forgotten Heroes, the “rules” of which I eagerly await, Mr. Crow…

Check out the other sites that host submissions in the blogroll, below. Ken from Blue Moose Arts has done a stellar job on a classic Grenadier dragon, while the aforementioned Roger has begun sculpting a monster from an old Hammer film (and it looks awesome). Matt from PM Painting has completed a second submission…one strangely familiar to this challenge, back when it was just me and it was called Monster Month…and may even have a third for us by month’s end. I’m hoping to get two or three more done myself, but we’ll see just how much I can accomplish!

In other news, I was looking around my man cave of miniatures when I realized I have painted a lot of them in my day. Not all of them are worthy of a blog post, neither do I have much to say about some of them after they’re painted…but upon the suggestion of others I have started an Instagram account.

This is my first foray into social media, as until now I have had no reason whatsoever to care what other people have for lunch every day or any wish to reconnect with people I haven’t seen in 30 years (I still don’t). Some may see this as purely self-aggrandizing (sorry, that still annoys me), and maybe it is. Put simply, it’s a way to share my hobby with others quickly and with minimum effort, and to meet other painters and see what they’re up to.

Here is my Instagram account.

There are only about a dozen posts up there now, but I’ve already seen some very cool paintjobs, and I even discovered a new podcast I like a lot. It’s called Tale of the Manticore, and it’s a mashup between actual play Basic D&D and a dark fantasy novel. The guy who creates it decided he would write a story, make all the characters, and then let the dice determine everything. No one is safe, and it’s gotten pretty hairy already. Brings back a lot of memories of the fleeting nature of being a first-level character. I binged the first 6 episodes over the last 2 days. Check it out!

While you’re at it, check out all the other participants in Monster May(hem). Visit their sites and see what they’re up to!

Blogroll

Roger, aka Dick Garrison, from Rantings From Under the Wargames Table

Dave Stone from Wargames Terrain Workshop

Matt from PMPainting

Coyotepunc from Coyotepunc’s Creativity

Ken from Blue Moose Arts

Jeremy, aka Carrion Crow, from Carrion Crow’s Buffet

Harry from War Across the Ages

You can find links to all these blogs (and others) in the sidebar as well!

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11 Responses to “I Blame Roger!”

  1. “I blame Roger”

    Posts with this title are starting to become a habit, or maybe a rallying call to the oppressed painters of the world! (no probably not).

    I would love this to become a yearly event (at this rate there wont be many months left, to paint the rest of our figures ).

    I don’t normally do social media (like yourself), but i will go over and have a look at you ista pics.along with a trawl around the other blogs mentioned above.

    Here’s a thought perhaps we could do a “I blame Roger” month? Oh wait my wife already has one of them every month!

    Cheers Roger.

  2. Matt says:

    Oh wow, I had no idea you’d done a Reaper burrowing horror back in the day, and I also have no idea how I basically painted mine in the same colours you did yours. Weird.

    My third entry is plodding along in between painting up my Slaanesh force and doing laundry.

  3. Jeremy Winstanley says:

    Apologies for not commenting on your Owlbear in the previous post, Keith – thought I’d cover it off here, rather than two separate comments.

    Owlbears are a quintessential D&D monster and also a cool one. I quite like this particular version, as it looks suitably bulky, whereas others I’ve seen were a bit too bird-like. And a very nice paint job too.

    I’ll have to pull my finger out, as I’ve not progressed my monsters any further, as my *replacement* Tardis floor turned out to be a bit more labour-intensive than I anticipated.

    • I have faith in you, Jeremy. I’m also keen to see your Tardis interior, so take your time, mate (as the British would say).
      This owlbear is from Nolzur’s, which means he cost about $5 US, or like 87 pounds sterling, by my guess. I don’t really know. Your currency system is baffling. Anyway, he’s cheap, and pretty well sculpted. So I like him.
      Thanks as always for the kind words!

      • Matt says:

        Keith, if you think British money is confusing now, be glad you weren’t around pre-decimalization:

        “In the years just before decimalisation [in 1971], the circulating British coins were the half crown, two shillings or florin, shilling, sixpence, threepence, penny and halfpenny. The farthing (​1⁄4 penny) had been withdrawn on 1 January 1961. There was also the Crown, worth 25p; it was, and still is, legal tender, but normally did not circulate.” (From Wikipedia)

        I’m British and I cannot make head nor tail of this. I’m just glad I was born in 1972…

        • I was born in the same year, and my first trip to Britain was in 1988. I’m certain I overpaid for everything!

          • Harry says:

            Keith,
            I feel Ya brother. I visited Brazil in 1994 (I was living in Paraguay at the time) and the Crucero(sp) or Crucero Real or whatever it was called that month, had way too many zeros on each bill. As in the bills were in the 10s and 100s of millions if I recall. You had to know how many zeros to drop each day, their economy was a wreck. As visitors, we had no idea what each bill was worth. I remember changing $20 or 40 USD and having a huge was of cash, millions and millions on cruceros. We had to rely on the locals (honest upright citizens in sure) for exchanges. We paid WAY too much for everything.

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